3D Printed Windsurfing!?

It seems that you can’t move for 3D printing companies cropping up all over the place. Pick a market and you can guarantee that someone has worked out (or is at least planning) how 3D printing can be adapted for that particular application.

The latest area to feature 3D print technology is watersports – more specifically windsurfing. A trio of windy fanatics have set up a company specialising in 3D printing windsurf boards. If they can make a success of it then surfboards are next on the agenda.

Shanon Marks, Erik Johnson and Mark Laughlin started Made LLC with the idea of taking on the mainstream windsurfing brands that, in their opinion, produce overcomplicated, over lapping (performance characteristics) and over priced products.

Shanon Marks was interviewed by 3D Printing Australia, stating that the windsurfing industry is currently bogged down with issues causing confusion during a customers’ purchasing process.

Made LLC’s way, although on the surface is extremely technical, will in the end give a simplified experience to the rider.

To date, the company has produced a number of prototype boards to prove the concept works. During the interview, Chris Peters – a Melbourne based designer, kitesurfer and 3D print fanatic – was given one of these early designs to try out for himself.

The board was designed around Chris’ personal dynamics, as all of the company’s products are.

Riders use a performance tracking application (currently being developed as a mobile app) linked to near– field communication chips. This technology will study riders’ on water behaviour including bodyweight, height, course, speed, GPS, altitude (during jumps), time in motion, stationary time, average conditions, wave height and numbers of nearby sailors –amongst other headers.

With the ability to tweak and refine board designs based on this information, each product can be tailored to an individual’s wants and needs giving a uniquely personal experience.

At present it is only the board’s core which is 3D printed. A Fortus 900 3D Printer is used to manufacture the internal lattice stringers – more akin to techniques used in boat building than board design.

These ‘struts’ are then layered with bamboo and fibreglass. The plan, however, is for the company to move towards a 100% additive process (fully printed). This will cut down on waste and damage caused to the environment.

Made LLC are in the process of crowd funding their business and will be featuring it on Kickstarter soon.

Could this be the future of windsurfing design and production? Only time will tell.

(Source: 3d-printers.com.au)

Play Doh 3D Printer

3D printing is big news at the moment, with many believing that we’re right on the cusp of a revolution with this technology spearheading another industrial manufacturing boom.

Playing on this, US gadget retailer Think Geek decided to spoof everyone yesterday with its Play-Doh 3D printer for April Fool’s.

Whether you fell for it or not, you cannot fault the effort that went into pulling this stunt off. Good work.

3D Printed Snowboard

Here’s one for the extreme sports enthusiasts out there.

The forward thinking snowboard manufacturer Signal (the company that also produced an inflatable snowboard) have manufactured the world’s first 3D printed snowboard.

Created in multiple parts, before being assembled, and reinforced with steel strips to stop the board snapping, this is a one of a kind design.

The board has been put through its paces, tested in some tough snow conditions, and thanks to its specialist wide nose, managed to cope well with deep powder as well as on piste conditions.

Riders have mentioned that it is a little slow when being carved on its edge but other than this, it handled what was thrown at it with ease.

3D printed snowboards are certainly not about to go mainstream anytime soon, but this type of application does highlight the diverse nature of 3D printing technology.

(Source: signalsnowboards.com)

3D Print Yourself as a Gummy Sweet to your Loved One!
When the Japanese celebrate Valentine’s Day it’s only men who are recipients of gifts from secret admirers. Four weeks later Japanese women get their presents on what they call White Day.
During 2013’s White Day, Tokyo based 3D printing company, FabCafe, came up with the novel idea of getting men’s bodies scanned and printed as gummy sweets which they could then give as gifts to the lady in their lives.
FabCafe chose nine males to turn into edible delights but at $62 a pop these 3D printed sweet bodily delights definitely don’t come cheap.
It could be argued though that this type of gift is indeed thoughtful as what could be more personalised that a 3D printed body that you can eat?  The flipside, of course, is that the act of devouring your loved ones arms, legs and head could also be seen as bizarre.
From the same company that 3D printed faces onto chocolates, normal just isn’t something that FabCafe does.

3D Print Yourself as a Gummy Sweet to your Loved One!

When the Japanese celebrate Valentine’s Day it’s only men who are recipients of gifts from secret admirers. Four weeks later Japanese women get their presents on what they call White Day.

During 2013’s White Day, Tokyo based 3D printing company, FabCafe, came up with the novel idea of getting men’s bodies scanned and printed as gummy sweets which they could then give as gifts to the lady in their lives.

FabCafe chose nine males to turn into edible delights but at $62 a pop these 3D printed sweet bodily delights definitely don’t come cheap.

It could be argued though that this type of gift is indeed thoughtful as what could be more personalised that a 3D printed body that you can eat?  The flipside, of course, is that the act of devouring your loved ones arms, legs and head could also be seen as bizarre.

From the same company that 3D printed faces onto chocolates, normal just isn’t something that FabCafe does.

(Source: New York Daily News)

Patient receives 3D printed skull implant
Oxford Performance Material of Connecticut (OPM) recently manufactured a 3D printed skull implant that has been successfully used in reconstructive surgery. An un-named patient now has a skull that’s made up of 75% synthetic material.
The revolutionary new product, named OsteoFab, made history after being approved by the FDA and is the first of its kind. With porous characteristics, the implant will attract bone and red blood cells that will attach themselves and eventually mould into a perfectly formed skull.
Once the green light was given by the Food and Drug Administration the manufacturing process was started which saw it completed and ready for surgery on March 4th. OPM have been busy selling other implants to hospitals but permission from the FDA had to be granted before any could be used on patients.
President of OPM, Scott DeFelice, believes that not a single part of orthopaedics will be untouched by 3D printing. OPM sees the usage of their reconstructive implants going far beyond just that of the Patient Specific Cranial Device.
During an interview with TechNewDaily DeFelice hailed the new technology as highly profitable and commented: “If you can replace a bony void in someone’s head next to the brain, you have a pretty good platform for filling bony voids elsewhere.”

Patient receives 3D printed skull implant

Oxford Performance Material of Connecticut (OPM) recently manufactured a 3D printed skull implant that has been successfully used in reconstructive surgery. An un-named patient now has a skull that’s made up of 75% synthetic material.

The revolutionary new product, named OsteoFab, made history after being approved by the FDA and is the first of its kind. With porous characteristics, the implant will attract bone and red blood cells that will attach themselves and eventually mould into a perfectly formed skull.

Once the green light was given by the Food and Drug Administration the manufacturing process was started which saw it completed and ready for surgery on March 4th. OPM have been busy selling other implants to hospitals but permission from the FDA had to be granted before any could be used on patients.

President of OPM, Scott DeFelice, believes that not a single part of orthopaedics will be untouched by 3D printing. OPM sees the usage of their reconstructive implants going far beyond just that of the Patient Specific Cranial Device.

During an interview with TechNewDaily DeFelice hailed the new technology as highly profitable and commented: “If you can replace a bony void in someone’s head next to the brain, you have a pretty good platform for filling bony voids elsewhere.”

(Source: blogs.discovermagazine.com)

3D Printed Nike Trainers
Possibly one of the biggest commercial endorsements of 3D printing to date is that sports giant Nike are set to incorporate the technology into its Vapour Laser Talon.
Nike has actually used 3D printing for prototyping for years but the brand now feels the results are good enough for mainstream consumption.
Working closely with Olympic gold medal sprinter Michael Johnson Nike wanted to understand how he and his team train American Football players – especially during the 40-yard dash which tests the speed of each player.
Nike measured the performance of the cleats (known as studs in the UK) which help athletes to maintain their drive stance for longer on football turf.
The result is the Nike Vapour Laser Talon which is set to increase an athlete’s performance considerably.
Lance Walker, MJP Performance Director, explained that an athlete’s “zero step” is the pivotal point of a stride that can make or break an persons 40-yard time.
The few seconds before the first step hits the turf is when acceleration speed and propulsion are determined. During this phase, it’s all about geometry.
Nike’s brand new 3D printed plate allows players to maintain their drive position for longer and more efficiently.
Johnson commented: “Translated to the game of football, mastering the zero step can mean the difference between a defensive lineman sacking the quarterback or getting blocked.”

Nike engineers used SLS (Selective Laser Sintering) to create the shoe, a method that uses a high powered laser to bond molecules of material to build up high definition shapes.
Nike say; “The SLS process allows for the engineering and creation of shapes not possible with traditional manufacturing processes, as well as the ability to make design updates within hours instead of months to truly accelerate the innovation process to never seen speeds.” 

3D Printed Nike Trainers

Possibly one of the biggest commercial endorsements of 3D printing to date is that sports giant Nike are set to incorporate the technology into its Vapour Laser Talon.

Nike has actually used 3D printing for prototyping for years but the brand now feels the results are good enough for mainstream consumption.

Working closely with Olympic gold medal sprinter Michael Johnson Nike wanted to understand how he and his team train American Football players – especially during the 40-yard dash which tests the speed of each player.

Nike measured the performance of the cleats (known as studs in the UK) which help athletes to maintain their drive stance for longer on football turf.

The result is the Nike Vapour Laser Talon which is set to increase an athlete’s performance considerably.

Lance Walker, MJP Performance Director, explained that an athlete’s “zero step” is the pivotal point of a stride that can make or break an persons 40-yard time.

The few seconds before the first step hits the turf is when acceleration speed and propulsion are determined. During this phase, it’s all about geometry.

Nike’s brand new 3D printed plate allows players to maintain their drive position for longer and more efficiently.

Johnson commented: “Translated to the game of football, mastering the zero step can mean the difference between a defensive lineman sacking the quarterback or getting blocked.”

Nike engineers used SLS (Selective Laser Sintering) to create the shoe, a method that uses a high powered laser to bond molecules of material to build up high definition shapes.

Nike say; “The SLS process allows for the engineering and creation of shapes not possible with traditional manufacturing processes, as well as the ability to make design updates within hours instead of months to truly accelerate the innovation process to never seen speeds.” 

3D Print Recycling Shredder

German designer Marcus Thymark, who has won previous awards for his work, has developed a 3D print shredder which means you can recycle and reuse your unwanted 3D prints rather than just chucking them in the bin.

Grinding down and melting the plastic allows the user to extrude usable filament for 3D printing which is great for the environment and kinder on your wallet.

Marcus is also in the process of developing a new CNC milling machine due for completion any time soon.

In the meantime if you want to find out more about Marcus and his designs then check out his blog: www.thymark.com

3D Printed Lifesize Robot

Do you fancy a little side project to pass the time at weekends or ever contemplated having your own C3PO?

If this applies to you why not take a leaf out of French sculptor Gael Langevin’s book and 3D print your own robot?

InMoov

Affectionately referred to as InMoov, the 41 year old’s life size, open source 3D creation can be made by anyone who has access to 3D printing technology, some cheap circuit boards and a few motors.

InMoov was an idea that took shape at the start of 2012 during Langevin’s spare time.

Once each part of the robot is completed, Langeving shares printer files and assembly guides on his blog. You can also programme InMoov to respond to vocal commands – of which you can also find instructions for on his site.

Prosthetics

The technology used for InMoov is a something that could benefit the prosthetic limb market.

In fact the idea for the robot stems from the fact that Langevin was commissioned to make such a limb. The rest of the project flowed freely from that initial development.

The InMoov robot is just another way in which 3D printing technology can be used for the masses. With a little imagination and forward thinking the possibilities could be endless.

3D Printed Americana Guitar by Olaf Diegel
Renowned Cubify artist Olaf Diegel has come up with his masterpiece Americana design which will be going on show at NAMM, Anaheim, CA in January.
Olaf was inspired by his love of New York and set about creating a guitar that represents everything the city stands for.
The Americana is the perfect showcase for what 3D printing can achieve and demonstrates the intricacy and flexibility of the technology.
The organiser of the NAMM Show (National Association of Music Merchants Show) commented, ‘We are thrilled to unveil the Americana guitar, a real American masterpiece celebrating our passion for music, country and 3D printing at the NAMM Show along with our entire consumer 3D experience.’
‘We invite attendees, music brands and developers to experience Cubify, a secure hosting, publishing and production platform, and introduce the 3D lifestyle to their audiences.’ 
The Americana joins the rest of Olaf’s guitar collection and if you fancy buying it then they’re available for purchase now.

3D Printed Americana Guitar by Olaf Diegel

Renowned Cubify artist Olaf Diegel has come up with his masterpiece Americana design which will be going on show at NAMM, Anaheim, CA in January.

Olaf was inspired by his love of New York and set about creating a guitar that represents everything the city stands for.

The Americana is the perfect showcase for what 3D printing can achieve and demonstrates the intricacy and flexibility of the technology.

The organiser of the NAMM Show (National Association of Music Merchants Show) commented, ‘We are thrilled to unveil the Americana guitar, a real American masterpiece celebrating our passion for music, country and 3D printing at the NAMM Show along with our entire consumer 3D experience.’

‘We invite attendees, music brands and developers to experience Cubify, a secure hosting, publishing and production platform, and introduce the 3D lifestyle to their audiences.’ 

The Americana joins the rest of Olaf’s guitar collection and if you fancy buying it then they’re available for purchase now.

(Source: 3ders.org)

China opens world’s first 3D printing museum
On Jan 15th China unveiled the world’s first 3D printing museum at Beijing’s DRC Industrial Design and Creative Industry Base.
Visitors will now be able to experience just what this amazing technology can create. Anyone curious about 3D printing should get themselves along where they can have their entire body scanned. Multi-dimensional data is then stored and processed which after several hours ends up as a physical mini life like sculpture for the mantelpiece.
And it’s not just yourself you can print either! Cans, vases, shoes, dolls and iPhone cases and more are all available for printing too.
Along with the news that Staples are soon to be offering 3D printing in some of their European stores, 2013 could be remembered as the year 3D printing took the public stage.

China opens world’s first 3D printing museum

On Jan 15th China unveiled the world’s first 3D printing museum at Beijing’s DRC Industrial Design and Creative Industry Base.

Visitors will now be able to experience just what this amazing technology can create. Anyone curious about 3D printing should get themselves along where they can have their entire body scanned. Multi-dimensional data is then stored and processed which after several hours ends up as a physical mini life like sculpture for the mantelpiece.

And it’s not just yourself you can print either! Cans, vases, shoes, dolls and iPhone cases and more are all available for printing too.

Along with the news that Staples are soon to be offering 3D printing in some of their European stores, 2013 could be remembered as the year 3D printing took the public stage.