3D printed regenerative trainers
It was only a matter of time before bio tech and 3D printing joined forces and created something revolutionary, and that time is now…A London designer and University of Denmark professor have been beavering away to engineer a revolutionary new running shoe. Using regenerative protocells and 3D printing the new design has the ability to react to the wearer and the ground he or she is running on. The trainers can inflate or deflate depending on the terrain and as they’re made specifically for the user they fit your feet like a second skin.
 When you’re done for the day; simply pop them into a jar of live liquid protocells and be amazed as they repair themselves. The liquid can also be dyed any hue the wearer wishes and the shoes will take on that colour.
 Unveiled for the first time at the Wearable Futures conference these hi-tech synthetic kicks will put your worn out trainers to shame, but unfortunately they won’t be available until at least 2050 – in the meantime you’ll have to buy a normal pair like everyone else…

3D printed regenerative trainers

It was only a matter of time before bio tech and 3D printing joined forces and created something revolutionary, and that time is now…

A London designer and University of Denmark professor have been beavering away to engineer a revolutionary new running shoe. Using regenerative protocells and 3D printing the new design has the ability to react to the wearer and the ground he or she is running on. The trainers can inflate or deflate depending on the terrain and as they’re made specifically for the user they fit your feet like a second skin.


When you’re done for the day; simply pop them into a jar of live liquid protocells and be amazed as they repair themselves. The liquid can also be dyed any hue the wearer wishes and the shoes will take on that colour.


Unveiled for the first time at the Wearable Futures conference these hi-tech synthetic kicks will put your worn out trainers to shame, but unfortunately they won’t be available until at least 2050 – in the meantime you’ll have to buy a normal pair like everyone else…

(Source: theverge.com)

3D printed pizza!
Barcelona based food start up company Natural Machines are taking the 3D printing concept to edible levels. Pictures have recently been doing the rounds with their step-by-step 3D printed pizza.
3D printing food isn’t a new thing but the Spanish brand is making a bid with its Foodini machine to hit the mainstream market and bring this technology into people’s homes. Foods such as pizzas are perfect for the 3D printing process as they’re a layered design which these machines can cope with much better than more complicated eats.
It’s not just pizzas that the company have successfully printed; burgers and ravioli are all suitable for the Foodini machine – and the best part is the contraption is small enough to sit comfortably next to your espresso maker!

3D printed pizza!

Barcelona based food start up company Natural Machines are taking the 3D printing concept to edible levels. Pictures have recently been doing the rounds with their step-by-step 3D printed pizza.

3D printing food isn’t a new thing but the Spanish brand is making a bid with its Foodini machine to hit the mainstream market and bring this technology into people’s homes. Foods such as pizzas are perfect for the 3D printing process as they’re a layered design which these machines can cope with much better than more complicated eats.

It’s not just pizzas that the company have successfully printed; burgers and ravioli are all suitable for the Foodini machine – and the best part is the contraption is small enough to sit comfortably next to your espresso maker!

(Source: CNET)

3D printing is officially pants!

UK based company Tamicare is readying itself for the manufacturing of disposable underwear and using 3D printing techniques to do so.

3D printed clothes aren’t anything new; however, the company claims their products feel just like woven fabric thanks to its Cosyflex technology.

Printing a hybrid fabric by mixing natural latex, silicon, polyurethane and Teflon; the resulting textile is stretchy, comfortable and can be manufactured in a variety of different colours. It also takes just three seconds to knock a pair of throw away underwear out!

Tamicare consider their technology suitable for making other pieces of clothing as well – such as sportswear and medical bandages. Having the ability to produce bespoke clothing in minutes is great news and Tamicare are leading the way.

(Source: technabob.com)

The World’s first 3D printed metal gun
Texas based Solid Concepts have produced the world’s first 3D printed metal gun which has fired over 50 shots to date. The Austin based firm used a direct metal laser sintering process (DMLS) which allowed them to produce all parts except springs.
The assembly process takes between five and seven minutes and relies totally on metal components to work. Previously, the Liberator – until this point the most sophisticated example of a 3D printed gun available – could only be shot once and is manufactured from plastic.
Designs for the Liberator were shared online earlier this year and sparked controversy with fears of guns being manufactured in people’s homes. Modelled on a WWII pistol it was accurate to just a few metres whereas the Solid Concepts version has been filmed hitting targets dozens of metres away. Ammunition is .45 Winchester white box types which are sold separately.
Printing illegal firearms at home has long been a concern, making it into political debates regularly. Great Manchester police made headlines at the start of October when they supposedly discovered parts for a 3D printed gun. Later this was proved not to be the case with the seizure actually being items for the printer itself.
Metal 3D printing requires very different machines to ones currently available for domestic use. You then need access to powdered metals and the right expertise to make a pistol from scratch. Cost is the main deterrent to criminals with large sums of cash needing to be outlaid.
DMLS manager at Solid concepts said: “We weren’t trying to figure out a cheaper, easier, better way to make a gun - that wasn’t the point at all. What we were trying to do was dispel the commonly-held notion that DMLS parts are not strong enough or accurate enough for real-world applications.”
The company’s head of marketing, Scott McGowan, added: “There are barriers to entry that will keep the public away from this technology for years.”
Check out a video of the gun in action here.

The World’s first 3D printed metal gun

Texas based Solid Concepts have produced the world’s first 3D printed metal gun which has fired over 50 shots to date. The Austin based firm used a direct metal laser sintering process (DMLS) which allowed them to produce all parts except springs.

The assembly process takes between five and seven minutes and relies totally on metal components to work. Previously, the Liberator – until this point the most sophisticated example of a 3D printed gun available – could only be shot once and is manufactured from plastic.

Designs for the Liberator were shared online earlier this year and sparked controversy with fears of guns being manufactured in people’s homes. Modelled on a WWII pistol it was accurate to just a few metres whereas the Solid Concepts version has been filmed hitting targets dozens of metres away. Ammunition is .45 Winchester white box types which are sold separately.

Printing illegal firearms at home has long been a concern, making it into political debates regularly. Great Manchester police made headlines at the start of October when they supposedly discovered parts for a 3D printed gun. Later this was proved not to be the case with the seizure actually being items for the printer itself.

Metal 3D printing requires very different machines to ones currently available for domestic use. You then need access to powdered metals and the right expertise to make a pistol from scratch. Cost is the main deterrent to criminals with large sums of cash needing to be outlaid.

DMLS manager at Solid concepts said: “We weren’t trying to figure out a cheaper, easier, better way to make a gun - that wasn’t the point at all. What we were trying to do was dispel the commonly-held notion that DMLS parts are not strong enough or accurate enough for real-world applications.”

The company’s head of marketing, Scott McGowan, added: “There are barriers to entry that will keep the public away from this technology for years.”

Check out a video of the gun in action here.

(Source: theguardian.com)

3D Printed… Terminator!?
Thanks to recent developments within the prosthetics field we’re now tantalisingly close to being able to reproduce Terminator style limbs that operate just the same as Arnie’s futuristic version’s do.
Materials have become far more durable, stronger and lighter; much better than they were just a few years ago. 3D printing has been incorporated into the manufacturing process of prosthetics – a fact that would’ve been hard to believe only a few years ago when small plastic objects alone were difficult to print.
Richard Hague and students from Nottingham University have successfully 3D printed an arm which has a strong plastic structure, mobile joints and fingertip touch sensors. The results are quite stunning and are currently on display at the London Science Museum.
The field of prosthetics is looking brighter than ever with the Notts Uni arm being one such fine example. Being able to simply print complex objects in this manner means the cost implications are lowered making high quality products much more affordable.

3D Printed… Terminator!?

Thanks to recent developments within the prosthetics field we’re now tantalisingly close to being able to reproduce Terminator style limbs that operate just the same as Arnie’s futuristic version’s do.

Materials have become far more durable, stronger and lighter; much better than they were just a few years ago. 3D printing has been incorporated into the manufacturing process of prosthetics – a fact that would’ve been hard to believe only a few years ago when small plastic objects alone were difficult to print.

Richard Hague and students from Nottingham University have successfully 3D printed an arm which has a strong plastic structure, mobile joints and fingertip touch sensors. The results are quite stunning and are currently on display at the London Science Museum.

The field of prosthetics is looking brighter than ever with the Notts Uni arm being one such fine example. Being able to simply print complex objects in this manner means the cost implications are lowered making high quality products much more affordable.

(Source: nouse.co.uk)

3D printed pinhole camera

Clint O’Connor is a photography nut and hardware developer from Austin, Texas. He particularly enjoys the medium of pinhole photography, stating that the affects you can achieve by allowing light to refract onto film can be amazing. Although Clint uses digital methods he finds himself coming back, time and again, to the pinhole way of capturing images.

In this day and age the digital format appears to have eclipsed all other ways of consuming content and the way in which we live. And yet, the first six months of 2013 saw vinyl music sales increase by 33.5% and pinhole camera is a well searched term on Google. Clint’s company often sits in the number one position.

Previously Clint has manufactured his pinhole cameras from cardboard boxes and metal cans but up until recently his methods were difficult to reproduce on a mass scale and satisfy large orders.

Clint then purchased the Solidoodle 3D printer which revolutionised his approach to the manufacturing process. In an attempt to grow things further he launched the project on crowd funding website Kickstarter a few days go. ‘Pinhole – a 3D printed camera’ has already smashed 500% of its goal to date.

Clint has also managed to produce an exposure table for the Flyer 6x6 pinhole camera and there’s a Flickr page where people can post their pics.

(Source: pinholeprinted.com)

Asda to roll out 3D printing services
A York based branch of Asda (Walmart’s subsidiary UK chain for those in the States wondering) will be trialling the UK’s first supermarket 3D printing service. Prices will start at £40, 60% cheaper than other retailers, and you’ll be able to scan anything you wish and get it 3D printed. Once designs have been submitted they’re sent off to a factory where the detailed model will be produced.
A scanner is moved around the person’s body or object so as to cover the whole area. The whole process takes roughly two minutes. Files will then be sent off, printed and returned in time for collection during the customer’s next weekly shop.
October 15th will see the launch of the service before the concept is rolled out across stores nationwide.
"A statement from Asda said: 'Evolving well beyond simply filling frames with photographs of friends and family, 3D printed ‘mini me’ figures will add a whole new dimension to shoppers’ mantelpieces.
"The lifelike models are also expected to be popular as personalised wedding cake toppers, and you could even have a model of your family pet."

Asda to roll out 3D printing services

A York based branch of Asda (Walmart’s subsidiary UK chain for those in the States wondering) will be trialling the UK’s first supermarket 3D printing service. Prices will start at £40, 60% cheaper than other retailers, and you’ll be able to scan anything you wish and get it 3D printed. Once designs have been submitted they’re sent off to a factory where the detailed model will be produced.

A scanner is moved around the person’s body or object so as to cover the whole area. The whole process takes roughly two minutes. Files will then be sent off, printed and returned in time for collection during the customer’s next weekly shop.

October 15th will see the launch of the service before the concept is rolled out across stores nationwide.

"A statement from Asda said: 'Evolving well beyond simply filling frames with photographs of friends and family, 3D printed ‘mini me’ figures will add a whole new dimension to shoppers’ mantelpieces.

"The lifelike models are also expected to be popular as personalised wedding cake toppers, and you could even have a model of your family pet."




3D Printed Joy Division Artwork

The music industry has been massively targeted by purveyors of 3D printed works. Customisable, fully functioning guitars and records have all had the 3D treatment and now album artwork has had a dose of 3D medication.

Michael Zoellner, a German blogger and DIY 3D print fan has been experimenting with 3D printing for a while. Reportedly, after seeing the Grant Gee directed Joy Division documentary Zoellner was inspired to 3D print the band’s iconic Unknown Pleasures album artwork.

Designed by Peter Saville of Factory Records, the artwork is said to feature a radio wave image from a Pulsar CP 1919. Now instantly recognisable the cover is ingrained into many music fans’ minds.

Zoellner though did come up against a few problems during the process. Due to not being able to find a vector graphic or 3D model, the German experimentalist had to trace the waves by hand, which took some considerable time. He then had to transform his etchings into code to be able to print the 3D model.

3D printing album artwork could signify a resurgence of interest in a genre that’s all but been forgotten – ironic considering that digital is touted as one of the reasons physical album sales have declined. By offering something ultimately very different to what we’ve previously been offered, the art of making inspiring and iconic music album covers could be set for a comeback?

The one obstacle facing the 3D reproduction of this artwork though is copywrite. Open source community based content and illegal torrent sites walk tightropes so thin that a fall to the wrong side could happen at any given time.

Concerns over the easily accessible physibles – 3D print ready digital design files – are already sounding alarm bells in some spheres. 

However, the fact remains that 3D printing could herald the renaissance of timeless album artwork design and that is a big reason for music connoisseurs to shout about.

(Source: i.document.m05.de)

3D Printed customisable Storm Trooper Figures
During Disney’s Stars Wars Weekends (new for 2013) Walt Disney World is offering fans the opportunity to become 3D printed Stormtroopers. Under the banner of Disney’s D – Tech Me product line action figures can now be created using the much hyped 3D printing technology. Costing around $120, Stars Wars lovers will be asked to step into a booth where multiple cameras will shoot pictures of their face from different angles allowing a lifelike 3D scan to printed onto Stormtroopr figures. Mulyiple skin tone and hair choices are available and custom figures take up to 8 weeks for delivery. The technology has also been used to create Han Solo trapped in carbonite, with fan faces instead of Harrison Ford, and was reported here last year.

3D Printed customisable Storm Trooper Figures

During Disney’s Stars Wars Weekends (new for 2013) Walt Disney World is offering fans the opportunity to become 3D printed Stormtroopers. Under the banner of Disney’s D – Tech Me product line action figures can now be created using the much hyped 3D printing technology. Costing around $120, Stars Wars lovers will be asked to step into a booth where multiple cameras will shoot pictures of their face from different angles allowing a lifelike 3D scan to printed onto Stormtroopr figures. Mulyiple skin tone and hair choices are available and custom figures take up to 8 weeks for delivery. The technology has also been used to create Han Solo trapped in carbonite, with fan faces instead of Harrison Ford, and was reported here last year.

(Source: insidethemagic.net)

3D Printed Ear
With an ‘off the shelf’ purchased 3D printer researchers at Princeton University have printed  a functional ear that can ‘hear’ radio frequencies far beyond the capabilities of a humans range.
Combining 3D printed cells and nanoparticles led the group to cell culture and the eventual combining of a small coil antenna and cartilage. The team ended up creating a bionic ear.
This is the group’s first attempt at creating a fully functional organ which not only replicates human ability but also extends these capabilities using embedded electronics.
Using 3D printing to create living organs has been on the radar for a while but it’s only in recent months that several groups have started to report successes. The bionic ear produced by the Princeton team is the very first time scientists have demonstrated an effective interweaving of tissue with electronics.
Further work and research is needed but it’s not outside of the realms of possibility to believe this technology could be used to restore or enhance a humans hearing. Electrical signals produced by the ear could be connected to patient’s nerve endings – similar to with a conventional hearing aid.
Assistant professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering at Princeton University Michael McAlpine commented: ‘In general, there are mechanical and thermal challenges with interfacing electronic materials with biological materials
Previously, researchers have suggested some strategies to tailor the electronics so that this merger is less awkward. That typically happens between a 2D sheet of electronics and a surface of the tissue. However, our work suggests a new approach—to build and grow the biology up with the electronics synergistically and in a 3D interwoven format.’
Whichever way you look at it, 3D printing technology is making significant headway in the medical world and is perhaps the ideal application for 3D print technology? With further research and development on the cards, the world at large waits with baited breath for the results.

3D Printed Ear

With an ‘off the shelf’ purchased 3D printer researchers at Princeton University have printed  a functional ear that can ‘hear’ radio frequencies far beyond the capabilities of a humans range.

Combining 3D printed cells and nanoparticles led the group to cell culture and the eventual combining of a small coil antenna and cartilage. The team ended up creating a bionic ear.

This is the group’s first attempt at creating a fully functional organ which not only replicates human ability but also extends these capabilities using embedded electronics.

Using 3D printing to create living organs has been on the radar for a while but it’s only in recent months that several groups have started to report successes. The bionic ear produced by the Princeton team is the very first time scientists have demonstrated an effective interweaving of tissue with electronics.

Further work and research is needed but it’s not outside of the realms of possibility to believe this technology could be used to restore or enhance a humans hearing. Electrical signals produced by the ear could be connected to patient’s nerve endings – similar to with a conventional hearing aid.

Assistant professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering at Princeton University Michael McAlpine commented: ‘In general, there are mechanical and thermal challenges with interfacing electronic materials with biological materials

Previously, researchers have suggested some strategies to tailor the electronics so that this merger is less awkward. That typically happens between a 2D sheet of electronics and a surface of the tissue. However, our work suggests a new approach—to build and grow the biology up with the electronics synergistically and in a 3D interwoven format.’

Whichever way you look at it, 3D printing technology is making significant headway in the medical world and is perhaps the ideal application for 3D print technology? With further research and development on the cards, the world at large waits with baited breath for the results.

(Source: princeton.edu)